4.1. Howdy Core Command Line Utilities

This section describes the six Howdy core command line utilities.

  • howdy_core_cli shows the list of email addresses, and names, of Plex account holders who have access to your Plex server. It can also show emails and names of all people who can receive email notifications about your Plex server. One can also change the list of email addresses that are notified by email of the Plex server.
  • howdy_deluge_console is a mocked up Deluge client, whose operation is very similar to the deluge-console command line interface. It is designed for the most common operations of deluge-console, using Deluge server settings that are described in Section 2.2 and Section 2.3.1.
  • howdy_resynclibs summarizes information about the Plex servers to which you have access, summarizes the Plex library information for those Plex servers which you own, and can also refresh those libraries in your owned servers.
  • howdy_store_credentials sets up the Google OAuth2 services authentication from the command line, similarly to what howdy_config_gui does as described in Section 2.1.6 and in Section 2.3.3 when setting up the unofficial Google Music API.
  • rsync_subproc rsync copies (and removes) files from the remote server and optional remote subdirectory, to the local server and local directory, or vice-versa. This tool also allows one to update the location of the remote server, the remote subdirectory, and the local subdirectory. The update of the remote path, and local and remote subdirectories, can also be changed through the howdy_config_gui GUI, as described in Section 2.2.3 and Section 2.3.1 (see the screen shot in Fig. 2.23).
  • get_book_tor finds Magnet links of ebooks, and by default prints out the chosen magnet link. This executable uses the Jackett server to search for ebooks, and can optionally upload these links to the specified Deluge server (see Section 2.2). It borrows much of its workflow from get_tv_tor and get_mov_tor.

4.1.1. howdy_core_cli

The help output, when running howdy_core_cli -h, produces the following.

usage: howdy_core_cli [-h] [--username USERNAME] [--password PASSWORD] [--friends] [--mappedfriends] [--addmapping] [--guestemail GUEST_EMAIL] [--newemails NEW_EMAILS] [--replace_existing]

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  --username USERNAME   Your plex username.
  --password PASSWORD   Your plex password.
  --friends             Get list of guests of your Plex server.
  --mappedfriends       Get list of guests with mapping, of your Plex server.
  --addmapping          If chosen, then add extra friends from Plex friends.
  --guestemail GUEST_EMAIL
                        Name of the Plex guest email.
  --newemails NEW_EMAILS
                        Name of the new emails associated with the Plex guest email.
  --replace_existing    If chosen, replace existing email to send newsletter to.

As described in the above section, this CLI can do the following operations.

  • list the email addresses, with names (if found), of friends of your Plex server.
  • list the email addresses, with names (if found), of all people who have access to your Plex server.
  • change those people who can have access to your Plex server.

There are two parts to this tool: authentication and operation. Each operation with howdy_core_cli must be run with a given authorization. For example, to get a list of friends of the Plex server by giving the Plex username and password for your Plex server, you would run.

howdy_core_cli --username=XXXX --password=YYYY --friends

Authentication happens in two ways.

  • by providing the username and password for the Plex account that runs your Plex server. Here, provide it with,

    howdy_core_cli --username=XXXX --password=YYYY ...
    

    here, ... refers to subsequent commands. One must give a valid username and password, otherwise the program exits.

  • by implicitly using the Plex authorizations stored in ~/.config/howdy/app.db. Here, no extra authorization needs to be provided.

Here is how to do each of the three operations.

  • to list the email addresses and names of the Plex friends, run this way using implicit authorization, for example.

    howdy_core_cli --friends
    

    this will produce this type of output.

    XX HAVE FOUND NAMES, 0 DO NOT HAVE FOUND NAMES
    
    XX PLEX FRIENDS WITH NAMES
    
    NAME                       |  EMAIL
    ---------------------------|--------------------------------
    AAAAA                      |  A@AA.com
    BBBBB                      |  B@BB.com
    CCCCC                      |  C@CC.com
    DDDDD                      |  D@DD.com
    EEEEE                      |  E@EE.com
    ...
    

    this tool gets the names for each email address from the Google contacts on your authenticated Google account.

  • to list the email addresses and names of the people who can receive Plex newsletter and notification emails, run this way using implicit authorization, for example.

    howdy_core_cli --mappedfriends
    

    this will produce this type of output.

    XX HAVE FOUND NAMES, 0 DO NOT HAVE FOUND NAMES
    
    XX MAPPED PLEX FRIENDS WITH NAMES
    
    NAME                       |  EMAIL
    ---------------------------|--------------------------------
    AAAAA                      |  A@AA.com
    BBBBB                      |  B@BB.com
    CCCCC                      |  C@CC.com
    DDDDD                      |  D@DD.com
    EEEEE                      |  E@EE.com
    ...
    

    this tool gets the names for each email address from the Google contacts on your authenticated Google account.

  • to add new emails that will reveice Plex newsletter or notification emails, here we run with implicit authorization and add two new emails (A@XXX.com and A@YYY.com) associated with a Plex friend with email account A@AA.com. There can be two ways email addresses are added.

    1. to add these new emails while also getting emails at A@AA.com, run the following command,

      howdy_core_cli --addmapping --guestemail=A@AA.com --newemails=A@XXX.com,A@YYY.com
      
    2. to add these new emails while no longer getting emails at A@AA.com, run the following command but with --replace_existing,

      howdy_core_cli --addmapping --guestemail=A@AA.com --newemails=A@XXX.com,A@YYY.com --replace_existing
      

    Note that A@AA.com must be a friend email of the Plex server, otherwise this operation will not work.

4.1.2. howdy_deluge_console

This is a much reduced Deluge command line console client. It does the following operations: torrent info (info), removing torrents (rm or del), adding torrents (add), pausing and resuming torrents (pause or resume), and pushing credentials (push). Running howdy_deluge_console -h gives the following output.

usage: howdy_deluge_console [-h] {info,resume,pause,rm,del,add,push} ...

positional arguments:
  {info,resume,pause,rm,del,add,push}
                        Choose one of these three modes of operation: rm, add, pause, resume, or push.
    info                Print summary info on a specific torrent, or all torrents.
    resume              Resume selected torrents, or all torrents.
    pause               Pause selected torrents, or all torrents.
    rm (del)            Remove selected torrents, or all torrents.
    add                 Add a single torrent, as a magnet link or a file.
    push                Push settings for a new deluge server to configuration.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit

By convention, the variable md5_trunc refers to a truncated initial substring of the full torrent’s MD5 hash. For example, given an MD5 hash of a torrent, such as ed53ba61555cab24946ebf2f346752805601a7fb, a possible md5_trunc is ed5. One can specify a collection of multiple md5_trunc as long as they are valid and unique (such as md5_trunc_1, md5_trunc_2, ...).

It may be convenient to have some useful BASH shortcuts for howdy_deluge_console, which you can store in ~/.bashrc. Here is a snippet of self-explanatory aliases I find useful.

alias pdci='howdy_deluge_console info'
alias pdcr='howdy_deluge_console rm'
alias pdca='howdy_deluge_console add'
alias pdcp='howdy_deluge_console pause'
alias pdcres='howdy_deluge_console resume'

4.1.2.1. torrent info (info)

You can get nicely formatted information on a collection of torrents, or all torrents, through running howdy_deluge_console info. Running howdy_deluge_console info -h gives the following output.

usage: howdy_deluge_console info [-h] [-f] [torrent [torrent ...]]

positional arguments:
  torrent     The hash ID, or identifying initial substring, of torrents for which to get information. Example usage is "howdy_deluge_console info ab1 bc2", where "ab1" and "bc2" are the first three digits of
              the MD5 hashes of torrents to examine.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help  show this help message and exit
  -f, --file  If chosen, then spit out the torrent selections into a debug output file. Name of the file is given by howdy_deluge_console.YYYYMMDD-HHMMSS.txt

howdy_deluge_console info will show nicely formatted information on ALL torrents.

howdy_deluge_console info
Name: ubuntu-19.10-beta-desktop-amd64.iso
ID: ed53ba61555cab24946ebf2f346752805601a7fb
State: Seeding
Up Speed: 0.0 KiB/s
Seeds: 0 (72) Peers: 0 (3) Availability: 0.00
Size: 2.1 GiB/2.1 GiB Ratio: 0.000
Seed time: 0 days 00:01:40 Active: 0 days 00:01:53
Tracker status: ubuntu.com: Announce OK

Name: ubuntu-19.10-beta-live-server-amd64.iso
ID: ed4bd9a0aed4c5e5dd7911aa785a3d180e267e4d
State: Downloading
Down Speed: 901.9 KiB/s Up Speed: 0.0 KiB/s ETA: 0 days 00:12:58
Seeds: 8 (21) Peers: 1 (1) Availability: 8.01
Size: 5.0 MiB/691.0 MiB Ratio: 0.000
Seed time: 0 days 00:00:00 Active: 0 days 00:00:05
Tracker status: ubuntu.com: Announce OK
Progress: 0.72%             [#~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~]

You can give it a list of truncated MD5 hashes to get status information on selected torrents,

howdy_deluge_console info ed5
Name: ubuntu-19.10-beta-desktop-amd64.iso
ID: ed53ba61555cab24946ebf2f346752805601a7fb
State: Seeding
Up Speed: 112.2 KiB/s ETA: 0 days 02:47:24
Seeds: 0 (72) Peers: 1 (3) Availability: 0.00
Size: 2.1 GiB/2.1 GiB Ratio: 0.000
Seed time: 0 days 00:03:44 Active: 0 days 00:03:57
Tracker status: ubuntu.com: Announce OK

Furthermore, since this CLI does not have UNIX piping and redirect functionalities, running with the -f or --file flag will spit out a debug text output of torrent statuses, the same as spit out into the command line. The name of the debug output file is howdy_deluge_console.YYYYMMDD-HHMMSS.txt: the middle text is the 4-digit year, 2-digit month, 2-digit-day, followed by hour-min-second, at the time when the info command was requested.

4.1.2.2. removing torrents (rm or del)

You can remove some or all torrents by running howdy_deluge_console rm or howdy_deluge_console del. Running howdy_deluge_console rm -h gives the following output.

usage: howdy_deluge_console rm [-h] [-R] torrent [torrent ...]

positional arguments:
  torrent            The hash ID, or identifying initial substring, of torrents to remove.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help         show this help message and exit
  -R, --remove_data  Remove the torrent's data.
  • howdy_deluge_console rm md5trunc_1 md5_trunc_2 ... removes specified torrents but keeps whatever data has been downloaded on the Deluge server. You would run this once the torrent’s state was Seeding or Paused (see torrent info (info)).
  • howdy_deluge_console rm -R ... does the same, but also removes whatever data has been downloaded from the Deluge server.
  • howdy_deluge_console rm without specific torrents removes (or removes with deletion) ALL torrents from the Deluge server.

4.1.2.3. adding torrents (add)

You can add torrents to the Deluge server by running howdy_deluge_console add. You can add a torrent file as URL, a torrent file on disk, and a Magnet URI. Running howdy_deluge_console add -h gives the following output.

usage: howdy_deluge_console add [-h] torrent

positional arguments:
  torrent     The fully realized magnet link, or file, to add to the torrent server.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help  show this help message and exit
  • torrent file as remote URL:
howdy_deluge_console add http://releases.ubuntu.com/19.10/ubuntu-19.10-beta-live-server-amd64.iso.torrent
  • torrent file on disk:
howdy_deluge_console add ubuntu-19.10-beta-desktop-amd64.iso.torrent
howdy_deluge_console add "magnet:?xt=urn:btih:49efb5fdd274abb26c5ea6361d1d9be28e4db2d3&dn=archlinux-2019.09.01-x86_64.iso&tr=udp://tracker.archlinux.org:6969&tr=http://tracker.archlinux.org:6969/announce"

4.1.2.4. pausing and resuming torrents (pause or resume)

You can pause torrents on the Deluge server by running howdy_deluge_console pause, and you can resume them by running howdy_deluge_console resume.

  • You can pause/resume specific torrents by running howdy_deluge_console pause md5trunc_1 md5_trunc_2 ... or howdy_deluge_console resume md5trunc_1 md5_trunc_2 ....
  • You can pause/resume ALL torrents on the Deluge server by not specifying any truncated MD5 hashes, howdy_deluge_console pause or howdy_deluge_console resume.

4.1.2.5. pushing credentials (push)

You can push new Deluge server credentials (URL, port, username, and password) to the SQLite3 configuration database. Running howdy_deluge_console push -h gives its help syntax,

usage: howdy_deluge_console push [-h] [--host url] [--port port] [--username username] [--password password]

optional arguments:
  -h, --help           show this help message and exit
  --host url           URL of the deluge server. Default is localhost.
  --port port          Port for the deluge server. Default is 12345.
  --username username  Username to login to the deluge server. Default is admin.
  --password password  Password to login to the deluge server. Default is admin.

Push new Deluge server settings into the configuration database by running,

howdy_deluge_console push --host=HOST --port=PORT --username=USERNAME --password=PASSWORD

If those are valid settings, nothing more happens. If these are invalid settings, then specific error messages will print to the screen.

4.1.3. howdy_resynclibs

The help output, when running howdy_resynclibs -h, produces the following.

usage: howdy_resynclibs [-h] [--libraries] [--refresh] [--summary] [--library LIBRARY] [--servername SERVERNAME] [--servernames] [--noverify]

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  --libraries           If chosen, just give the sorted names of all libraries in the Plex server.
  --refresh             If chosen, refresh a chosen library in the Plex server. Must give a valid name for the library.
  --summary             If chosen, perform a summary of the chosen library in the Plex server. Must give a valid name for the library.
  --library LIBRARY     Name of a (valid) library in the Plex server.
  --servername SERVERNAME
                        Optional name of the server to check for.
  --servernames         If chosen, print out all the servers owned by the user.
  --noverify            Do not verify SSL transactions if chosen.

--noverify is a standard option in many of the Howdy CLI and GUIs to ignore verification of SSL transactions. It is optional and will default to False.

When running this CLI, you must choose one and only one of these options.

  • --servernames gives you the list of the Plex servers to which you have access, and which you own.
  • --libraries prints out a list of the libraries on the Plex server you chose and which you own. Here you can explicitly choose a Plex server by name with --servername=SERVERNAME or have a default one you own chosen for you.
  • --summary prints out a summary of the Plex library you have chosen with --library=LIBRARY.
  • --refresh refreshes the Plex library you have chosen withh --library=LIBRARY.

Here I find it useful to show how this tool works by example.

  1. First, we can determine those Plex servers to which we have access

    howdy_resynclibs --servernames
    

    This will print out a nicely formatted table. Each row is a Plex server. The columns are the server’s name, whether we own it, and its remote URL with port (which is of the form https://IP-ADDRESS:PORT).

    Name           Is Owned    URL
    -------------  ----------  ---------------------------
    tanim-desktop  True        https://IP-ADDR1:PORT1
    XXXX           False       https://IP-ADDR2:PORT2
    YYYY           False       https://IP-ADDR3:PORT3
    
  2. Now we can look for the Plex libraries in the Plex server which we own. If we don’t choose a Plex server with --servername=SERVERNAME, then the first one in the row which we own will be chosen by default. The syntax is,

    howdy_resynclibs --servername=tanim-desktop --libraries
    

    This will print out a nicely formatted table. Each row is a library. There is a column of the library’s name and its type. I have only shown three of the six Plex libraries on my server.

    Here are the 6 libraries in this Plex server: tanim-desktop.
    
    Name                Library Type
    ------------------  --------------
    Movies              movie
    Music               artist
    XXXX                AAAA
    YYYY                BBBB
    TV Shows            show
    ZZZZ                CCCC
    

    movie means Movies, show means TV shows, and artist means music.

  3. We can get summary information about each Plex library with the --summary flag and --library=LIBRARY. Here are the three examples on getting summary information on a movie, TV show, and music library. This summary information may take a while.

    • On a movie library.

      tanim-desktop $ howdy_resynclibs --servername=tanim-desktop --library=Movies --summary
      
      "Movies" is a movie library. There are 1886 movies here. The total size of movie media is 1.632 TB.
      The total duration of movie media is 4 months, 20 days, 19 hours, 50 minutes, and 22.054 seconds.
      
    • On a TV show library.

      tanim-desktop $ howdy_resynclibs --servername=tanim-desktop --library="TV Shows" --summary
      
      "TV Shows" is a TV library. There are 21167 TV files in 236 TV shows. The total size of TV media is
      5.301 TB. The total duration of TV shows is 1 year, 2 months, 15 days, 11 hours, 42 minutes, and
      6.409 seconds.
      
    • On a music library.

      tanim-desktop $ howdy_resynclibs --servername=tanim-desktop --library=Music --summary
      
      "Music" is a music library. There are 9911 songs made by 814 artists in 1549 albums. The total size
      of music media is 54.785 GB. The total duration of music media is 26 days, 18 hours, 59 minutes, and
      55.185 seconds.
      
  4. Finally, we can refresh a library that we specify with the --refresh flag and --library=LIBRARY. Here are three examples on how to refresh the movie, TV show, and music library.

    howdy_resynclibs --servername=tanim-desktop --library=Movies --refresh
    howdy_resynclibs --servername=tanim-desktop --library="TV Shows" --refresh
    howdy_resynclibs --servername=tanim-desktop --library=Music --refresh
    

4.1.4. howdy_store_credentials

Section 4.1 describes this executable’s functionality very well. Its help screen can be displayed by running howdy_store_credentials -h,

usage: howdy_store_credentials [-h] [--noverify]

optional arguments:
  -h, --help  show this help message and exit
  --noverify  If chosen, do not verify SSL connections.

The --noverify flag disables the verification of SSL connections. First, run this executable, howdy_store_credentials, which will return this interactive text dialog in the shell.

tanim-desktop $ howdy_store_credentials
Please go to this URL in a browser window:https://accounts.google.com/o/oauth2/auth...
After giving permission for Google services on your behalf,
type in the access code:

Second, go to the URL to which you are instructed. Once you copy that URL into your browser, you will see a browser window as shown in Step #3, Step #5, Step #6, and Step #7 in Section 2.1.6.

Third, paste the code as described in Step #7 into the interactive text dialog, ...type in the access code:. Once successful, you will receive this message in the shell,

Success. Stored GOOGLE credentials.

4.1.5. rsync_subproc

The help output, when running rsync_subproc -h, produces the following.

usage: rsync_subproc [-h] [-S STRING] [-N NUMTRIES] [-D] [-R] {-P} ...

positional arguments:
  {push}
    push                push RSYNC credentials into configuration file.

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -S STRING, --string STRING
                        the globbed string to rsync from on the remote account. Default is "*.mkv".
  -N NUMTRIES, --numtries NUMTRIES
                        number of attempts to go through an rsync process. Default is 10.
  -D, --debug           if chosen, then write debug output.
  -R, --reverse         If chosen, push files from local server to remote. Since files are deleted from source once done, you should probably make a copy of the source files if you want to still keep them afterwards.

This executable provides a convenient higher-level command-line interface to rsync uploading and downloading that resumes on transfer failure, and deletes the origin files once the transfer is complete. One also does not need to execute this command in LOCAL_DIR.

The main rsync based uploading and downloading is described in rsync based functionality. Setting the SSH credentials, and local and remote locations, is described in rsync_subproc settings with push.

4.1.5.1. rsync based functionality

One can either upload files and directories to, or download files and directories from, the remote location and the remote subdirectory (which we call SUBDIR). The local directory is called LOCAL_DIR. If the remote directory is not defined, it is by default the home directory of that account.

The debug flag, -D or --debug, is extremely useful, as it displays the lower level shell command that is executed to get the rsync transfer going.

The files or directories are selected with -S STRING or --string=STRING and follows the standard POSIX globbing convention. For instance, you can specify -S "The*" (STRING in quotations) to select the remote directory The Simpsons to download. In order to simplify this CLI’s behavior,

  • There can be no spaces in the STRING selection.
  • The STRING selection does not behave as a Regular expression.

The -N or --numtries flag sets the number of tries that the rsync process will attempt before giving up or finishing the transfer. The default is 10, but this number must be \(\ge 1\).

To download a remote directory (SUBDIR/Ubuntu_18.04) until success into LOCAL_DIR, and delete all files inside the remote directory, you can run this command with debug.

tanim-desktop $ rsync_subproc -D -S "Ubuntu_*"
STARTING THIS RSYNC CMD: rsync --remove-source-files -P -avz --rsh="/usr/bin/sshpass XXXX ssh" -e ssh YYYY@ZZZZ:SUBDIR/Ubuntu_* LOCAL_DIR
TRYING UP TO 10 TIMES.

SUCCESSFUL ATTEMPT 1 / 10 IN 25.875 SECONDS.

Note that after a period of time (here, 25.875 seconds), the process will terminate with either a descriptive success or descriptive failure message. Note that in the debug output, the SSH password is not printed out (except for an XXXX).

To upload the local directory (LOCAL_DIR/Ubuntu_18.04) until success into SUBDIR, and delete all files inside the local directory, you can run this command with debug and the -R or --reverse flag.

tanim-desktop $ rsync_subproc -D -R -S Ubuntu*
STARTING THIS RSYNC CMD: rsync --remove-source-files -P -avz --rsh="/usr/bin/sshpass XXXX ssh" -e ssh LOCAL_DIR/Ubuntu_18.04 YYYY@ZZZZ:SUBDIR/
TRYING UP TO 10 TIMES.

SUCCESSFUL ATTEMPT 1 / 10 IN 264.802 SECONDS.

4.1.5.2. rsync_subproc settings with push

Running rsync_subproc push will update or set the SSH settings for the remote server, and the local and remote subdirectories. Section 2.2.3 and Section 2.3.1 (see the screen shot in Fig. 2.23) describe the form that these settings take. The help output, when running rsync_subproc push -h, produces the following.

usage: rsync_subproc push [-h] [-L LOCAL_DIR] [--ssh SSHPATH] [--subdir SUBDIR]

optional arguments:
  -h, --help       show this help message and exit
  -L LOCAL_DIR     Name of the local directory into which we download files and directory. Default is XXXX.
  --ssh SSHPATH    SSH path from which to get files.
  --subdir SUBDIR  name of the remote sub directory from which to get files. Optional.
  • the format of the SSH setting is username@ssh_server.
  • the SUBDIR is located relative to the usename home directory on ssh_server, $HOME/SUBDIR.
  • the LOCAL_DIR local directory is described with an absolute path.

Thus, to set settings for rsync_subproc, one would run,

rsync_subproc push -L LOCAL_DIR --ssh=username@ssh_server --subdir=SUBDIR

Note that here, the SSH password is the same as the remote Deluge server’s password. See, e.g., Section 4.1.2 or Section 2.2.3 and figures therein.

4.1.6. get_book_tor

The help output, when running get_book_tor -h, produces the following.

usage: get_book_tor [-h] -n NAME [--maxnum MAXNUM] [-f FILENAME] [--add] [--info] [--noverify]

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -n NAME, --name NAME  Name of the book to get.
  --maxnum MAXNUM       Maximum number of torrents to look through. Default is 10.
  -f FILENAME, --filename FILENAME
                        If defined, put magnet link into filename.
  --add                 If chosen, push the magnet link into the deluge server.
  --info                If chosen, run in info mode.
  --noverify            If chosen, do not verify SSL connections.

These are common flags used by all standard operations of this CLI.

  • --info prints out INFO level logging output.
  • --noverify does not verify SSL connections.

The -n or --name flag is used to specify the ebook, for example Plagues and Peoples by William McNeill.

Here is how to get this ebook, Plagues and Peoples. The selection of ebook torrents are much smaller than TV shows and movies, so we often get one choice rather than multiple choices. If we had multiple choices, we could choose a given Magnet link by number, and the choices are sorted by the total number of seeds (SE) and leechers (LE) found for that link. The Magnet link is printed out here.

tanim-desktop $ get_book_tor -n "Plagues and Peoples"
Chosen book: Plagues and Peoples (2.1 MiB)
magnet link: magnet:?xt=urn:btih:85C37477333AD716864B3D25F5DFF1B9AFF1ADE6&dn=Plagues+and+Peoples&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.coppersurfer.tk%3A6969%2Fannounce&tr=udp%3A%2F%2F9.rarbg.to%3A2920%2Fannounce&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.opentrackr.org%3A1337&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.internetwarriors.net%3A1337%2Fannounce&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.leechers-paradise.org%3A6969%2Fannounce&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.coppersurfer.tk%3A6969%2Fannounce&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.pirateparty.gr%3A6969%2Fannounce&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.cyberia.is%3A6969%2Fannounce

We can modify this command with the following.

  • -f or --filename is used to output the Magnet URI into a file,

    tanim-desktop $ get_book_tor -n "Plagues and Peoples" -f plagues_and_peoples.txt
    Chosen book: Plagues and Peoples (2.1 MiB)
    
  • --add adds the Magnet URI to the Deluge server. The operation of howdy_deluge_console is described in Section 4.1.2.

    tanim-desktop: torrents $ get_book_tor -n "Plagues and Peoples" --add
    Chosen book: Plagues and Peoples (2.1 MiB)
    ...
    tanim-desktop: torrents $ howdy_deluge_console info
    Name: Plagues and Peoples
    ID: 85c37477333ad716864b3d25f5dff1b9aff1ade6
    State: Downloading
    Down Speed: 0.0 KiB/s Up Speed: 0.0 KiB/s
    Seeds: 0 (1) Peers: 0 (1) Availability: 0.00
    Size: 0.0 KiB/0.0 KiB Ratio: -1.000
    Seed time: 0 days 00:00:00 Active: 0 days 00:00:35
    Tracker status: coppersurfer.tk: Announce OK
    Progress: 0.00% [~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~]